Habitat of the American toad
Habitat of the American toad
 
 
An adult toad
An adult toad
 
 
The toad's dewlap
The toad's dewlap
 
 
Looking for food
Looking for food
 
 
Toads have bumpy skin.
Toads have bumpy skin.
 
 
Close-up of a toad
Close-up of a toad
 
 
The full body of a toad
The full body of a toad
 
American Toad
Topic(s):   Amphibians, Forest Animals, Freshwater Animals, Wetland Animals, Woodland Animals
Quick Facts
Type of Animal amphibian
Habitat freshwater, forest, wetland, woodland
Diet spiders, earthworms, snails, slugs, insects
Male male
Female female
Baby tadpole
Group knot
Predators snakes, owls, skunks, raccoons
Endangered no

The American Toad can be many colors like tan, brown, brick-red, and green. It has warts on its skin. Warts are bumps. It has spots on its belly. An adult toad is chubby. It can get to be almost 4.5 inches (11 centimeters) long.

The big sack under its neck is called a dewlap. The toad blows up its dewlap like a bubble gum bubble when it wants to sing. It sings in the spring to attract a mate. After mating, the female lays thousands of eggs in a pond or other water. The eggs hatch into tadpoles. The tadpoles look like fish at first. After a while, they grow legs and lose their tails. They have lungs. Now they are toads!

This toad can eat up to 1,000 insects a day. It sticks out its tongue to catch flies and spiders to eat. The toad hides from predators under rocks or leaves. Its skin gives off a nasty chemical to keep animals away. A toad may puff up its body or play dead to protect itself.

In the fall, the toad digs a hole three feet (one meter) into the ground. It sleeps all winter in this hole. The American Toad can live up to 30 years. Most do not live more than a year or two, though. It is found in the eastern half of Canada and the United States.

People cannot get warts from touching a toad. The toad helps our environment by eating garden pests.

Resource information

American Toad - Bufo americanus - NatureWorks. (n.d.). New Hampshire Public Television. Retrieved March 16, 2013, from http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/americantoad.htm

American toad. (n.d.). Fairfax County Public Schools. Retrieved March 16, 2013, from http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/american_toad.htm

Grossman, S. (n.d.). Animal Diversity Web: Anaxyrus americanus. Museum of Zoology at the University of Michigan. Retrieved March 16, 2013, from http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Anaxyrus_americanus/

Citation information

APA Style: American Toad. (2013, March). Retrieved from Facts4Me at http://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: "American Toad." Facts4Me. Mar. 2013. http://www.facts4me.com.

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