The Colosseum, a Roman amphitheater
The Colosseum, a Roman amphitheater
 
 
A triumphal arch, the Arch of Constantine
A triumphal arch, the Arch of Constantine
 
 
The Circus Maximus, a chariot racing statdium
The Circus Maximus, a chariot racing statdium
 
 
A Roman forum
A Roman forum
 
 
Part of the aqueduct system of Rome
Part of the aqueduct system of Rome
 
 
Section of the Apian Way, ancient road of Rome
Section of the Apian Way, ancient road of Rome
 
 
Example of a Roman public bath
Example of a Roman public bath
 
Architecture <br>in Ancient Rome
Topic(s):   Ancient Rome

The Romans got ideas for their architecture from other countries. They got many ideas from the Etruscans and the Greeks. The Romans changed things, though. They used a lot of arches, domes, and concrete.

Arches and domes were important. They made it possible to build a building with open space inside. Without arches and domes, a building had to be full of columns to hold up the roof. Concrete was also important. It was strong and cheap.

Romans liked arches. They built triumphal arches. These arches honored war victories. The Romans could also build a really big building using arches and concrete. They often put bricks or stone on the outside of the concrete to make it look better.

Some of the big buildings were apartments or temples. Some were basilicas. These were used for large indoor events. The biggest buildings were amphitheaters. These were used for gladiator games. They looked a bit like football stadiums. The best-known amphitheater is the Colosseum in Rome.

The Romans made improvements to their cities. They built aqueducts to bring water from far away. The Romans made sewers and roads. They built forums. A forum was a plaza. Each forum had shops and places to gather or make speeches.

Romans were also fond of public baths. A public bath was like a health club. It had pools for bathing and swimming. It also had exercise rooms, libraries, and theaters. A public bath could be very fancy.

Resource information

Carr, K. (2012, November 21). Roman Architecture - Ancient Rome for Kids! Retrieved April 9, 2013, from http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/romans/architecture/romarch.htm

Carr, K. (2012, October 6). Roman Sewage - Ancient Rome for Kids! Retrieved April 9, 2013, from http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/romans/science/sewage.htm

Carr, K. (2012, October 10). What is Cement? - Architecture for Kids? Retrieved April 9, 2013, from http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/arts/cement.htm

The Early Christian Basilica. (n.d.). Retrieved April 9, 2013, from http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/arth212/early_christian_basilica.html

Essential Humanities. (n.d.). Roman Architecture. Retrieved April 9, 2013, from http://www.essential-humanities.net/western-art/western-architecture/roman-architecture/#raquo_Introduction

Scholastic.com. (n.d.). Ancient Roman Art and Architecture. Retrieved April 10, 2013, from http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3753873

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