Pages from the Book of Esther <br>written in Hebrew
Pages from the Book of Esther
written in Hebrew
 
 
A painting of Esther with her father, Mordechai
A painting of Esther with her father, Mordechai
 
 
A painting of Esther telling the king <br>about Haman
A painting of Esther telling the king
about Haman
 
 
A noise maker called a gragger is used during the reading of the Book of Esther.
A noise maker called a gragger is used during the reading of the Book of Esther.
 
 
A plate filled with Hamantaschen, <br>special cookies made to celebrate Purim
A plate filled with Hamantaschen,
special cookies made to celebrate Purim
 
 
Purim is a happy holiday.
Purim is a happy holiday.
 
Purim
Topic(s):   Holidays & Celebrations
Quick Facts
Name: Purim (Feast of Lots)
Celebrated on: February 28, 2018
Started: unknown

Purim is a happy day. It celebrates the time when Queen Esther saved the Jewish people in Persia.

Esther was a wife of the king of Persia. He did not know she was Jewish. Estherís adopted father was Mordechai. Mordechai would not bow down to the kingís advisor, Haman. Haman hated Mordechai and the Jews. He told the king that they were a threat. The king agreed to have Mordechai and the Jews killed. Haman chose the date for this by casting lots. That means he picked the date by chance, maybe by throwing dice. The date he chose was Adar 13.

Esther wanted to tell the king. This was dangerous. The king had ordered all Jews to be killed. Esther fasted for three days. That means she did not eat. Then she went to the king. She told him she was Jewish. She told him Haman was evil. He believed her. The king had Haman killed instead. He gave the Jewish people the right to fight.

Purim is celebrated on the day when the Jewish people fought off their attackers. In certain walled cities, it is celebrated the next day on Adar 15.

The day before Purim, people fast like Esther did. On Purim, the Book of Esther is read. People boo and hiss when they hear the name Haman. They cheer when they hear the name Mordechai. People also eat and drink to celebrate. They exchange gifts and send food to the poor. Sometimes, there are Purim plays.

Resource information

Parsons, J. J. (n.d.). Purim - Celebration of deliverance. Retrieved from http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/Winter_Holidays/Purim/purim.html

Project Genesis: Purim. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.torah.org/learning/yomtov/purim/

Purim. (n.d.). In Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/483999/Purim

Purim. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/holiday9.html

Citation information

APA Style:† † † †Purim. (2018, January). Retrieved from Facts4Me at http://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: † † † "Purim."Facts4Me. Jan. 2018. http://www.facts4me.com.

Back To Previous          Back To Top

Copyright © 2006 - 2018, Facts4Me. All rights reserved.