The official portrait of Mary Todd Lincoln
The official portrait of Mary Todd Lincoln
 
 
A newly married Abraham and Mary Lincoln
A newly married Abraham and Mary Lincoln
 
 
Mary and Abraham with two of their sons
Mary and Abraham with two of their sons
 
 
Photos of President and Mrs. Lincoln
Photos of President and Mrs. Lincoln
 
 
Mary with Lincoln after the shooting
Mary with Lincoln after the shooting
 
 
A portrait of Mary Todd Lincoln
A portrait of Mary Todd Lincoln
 
#16 Lincoln, Mary
Topic(s):   First Ladies (U.S.)
Quick Facts
Full name Mary Todd Lincoln
Born December 13, 1818 (Lexington, Kentucky)
Died July 16, 1882 (Springfield, Illinois)
Nationality American
First Lady Number 16
Dates in the White House March 4, 1861 to April 15, 1865
Occupation(s) wife, mother
Major Achievement(s) encouraged President Lincoln to sign Emancipation Proclamation; first to invite African-Americans to White House

Mary Toddís family was wealthy. She had French tutors and dance lessons.

Mary was short and plump. She was the life of the party. Abraham Lincoln was different. He was tall and thin. Lincolnís family was poor. He grew up in a log cabin in the woods.

They met at a dance. They both liked politics. Mary thought Abraham could do big things. They married in 1842. The Lincolns lived in Springfield until 1860. They had four sons.

Mary could be moody and selfish. But she gave her husband good advice. Mary wanted Abe to be President. She wanted to be First Lady.

The Lincolns came to the White House during troubled times. The Civil War began soon after they arrived. Life was hard for the Lincolns in the White House. Their middle son died suddenly. They were both very sad.

People in Washington did not like Mary Todd Lincoln. They thought she spent too much money. In four months, she bought 300 pairs of gloves. There were rumors that she was a Southern spy. She had a quick temper.

Abraham Lincoln was shot days after the Civil War ended. Mary was shattered. She owed money. She fled to Europe with her youngest son, Tad. Sadly, Tad died at age 18. Mary's older son, Robert, had her put in an insane asylum. Her state of mind improved. She was cleared of insanity. Late in life, she was nearly blind and unable to walk. Mary Todd Lincoln led a hard life.

Resource information

Bausum, A. (2007). Our country's first ladies. Washington, DC: National Geographic.

Gormley, B. (1997). First ladies: Women who called the White House home. New York: Scholastic Inc.

Kramer, S. (2001). The look-it-up book of first ladies. New York: Random House.

Pastan, A., & Smithsonian Institution. (2009). First ladies. New York: DK.

Schneider, D., & Schneider, C. J. (2001). First ladies: A biographical dictionary. New York: Facts on File.

Citation information

APA Style:† † † † Mary Todd Lincoln. (2017, February). Retrieved from Facts4Me at http://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: † † † "Mary Lincoln." Facts4Me. Feb. 2017. http://www.facts4me.com.

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