British Parliament passing the Stamp Act
British Parliament passing the Stamp Act
 
 
Samples of the tax stamp
Samples of the tax stamp
 
 
Colonists reading about the Stamp Act
Colonists reading about the Stamp Act
 
 
Colonists protesting the Stamp Act
Colonists protesting the Stamp Act
 
Stamp Act, The
Topic(s):   Revolutionary War (U.S.)

British government announced the Stamp Act in 1765. The Stamp Act made colonists pay a fee on all important documents. Every calendar and every newspaper had to be printed on costly stamped paper. So, too, did wills, ads, posters, and even playing cards.

The Stamp Act made the colonists mad. It taxed things they used all the time. In Virginia, Patrick Henry spoke out against the tax. Sam Adams formed the Sons of Liberty. The Sons of Liberty led protests against the Stamp Act. For the first time, all the colonies acted as one. Colonists felt the British government should not tax them. They did not have anyone representing them in British government. Colonists chanted no taxation without representation.

Colonists were angry with agents who sold the hated stamps. They stopped buying British goods. In less than six months, the British government ended the Stamp Act. But the British passed other taxes on the colonies. Britain felt it had every right to tax the colonies.

Resource information

Bigelow, B. C., McConnell, S. A., & Schmittroth, L. (2000). American Revolution: Almanac. Detroit: UXL.

Dolan, E. F. (1995). The American Revolution: How we fought the War of Independence. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press.

Freedman, R. (2000). Give me liberty!: The story of the Declaration of Independence. New York: Holiday House.

Osborne, M. P., & Boyce, N. P. (2013). Magic tree house fact tracker #11: American Revolution. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers.

Citation information

APA Style: The Stamp Act. (2015, January). Retrieved from Facts4Me at http://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: "The Stamp Act." Facts4Me.com. N.p., Jan. 2015. Web.

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