General Washington crossing the Delaware River
General Washington crossing the Delaware River
 
 
On shore, Washington leading his troops to Trenton
On shore, Washington leading his troops to Trenton
 
 
The patriots engaging the British in Trenton
The patriots engaging the British in Trenton
 
 
General Washington charging the British
General Washington charging the British
 
 
Victory for the patriots
Victory for the patriots
 
 
The British surrendering to the patriots
The British surrendering to the patriots
 
Crossing the Delaware <br>Battle of Trenton
Topic(s):   Revolutionary War (U.S.)

In late fall of 1776, the Continental Army was not doing well. The colonists had not won a battle in months. The British held America's largest city, New York. General George Washington and his men had retreated through New Jersey. Washington wrote to his brother, I think the game is pretty near up. General Washington needed to rally his troops and give them hope.

Washington created a bold plan. Hessian soldiers (German soldiers hired by the British) held Trenton, across the Delaware River. The plan was to attack them on Christmas night. Washington hoped the Germans would be fast asleep after their Christmas feasts. He wanted to surprise them.

The patriots crossed the river by boat throughout the night. There were huge chunks of ice in the water. It was raining and sleeting. The freezing troops landed on the New Jersey shore. Then they marched more than six miles to Trenton. They left bloody footprints in the snow.

Washington's attack was a complete success. The patriots took more than 900 prisoners. They also got some badly needed supplies. There was great joy in the colonies when they learned about the Battle of Trenton. The patriot cause was still alive.

Resource information

Bigelow, B. C., McConnell, S. A., & Schmittroth, L. (2000). American Revolution: Almanac. Detroit: UXL.

Bohannon, L. F. (2004). The American Revolution. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co.

Dolan, E. F. (1995). The American Revolution: How we fought the War of Independence. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press.

Dorf, P., & In McKee, S. D. (1937). Visualized American history: Unit organization. New York: Oxford Book Co.

Maestro, B., & Maestro, G. (2005). Liberty or death: The American Revolution, 1763-1783. New York: HarperCollins.

Osborne, M. P., & Boyce, N. P. (2013). Magic tree house fact tracker #11: American Revolution. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers.

Citation information

APA Style: Crossing the Delaware (Battle of Trenton). (2015, April). Retrieved from Facts4Me at http://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: "Crossing the Delaware (Battle of Trenton)." Facts4Me.com. N.p., Apr. 2015. Web.

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